The Three Parts to the Clarity of Speech

How is speech developed?

There’s a clear progression of the development of speech in all children within their native language.

Progression of speech

Children learn to say the tones and sounds of their native language first. Those sounds eventually become words and sentences. Then its the appropriate volume of the toddler and later the development of their enunciation throughout the following years.

REMEMBER: there is a progression from tones and sounds, to words and sentences and eventually enunciation.

Speech versus Language

speech

  • Speech is the verb. The act of speaking.
  • Language is syntax, writing, grammar -such as conjugating words, vocabulary, listening, speaking, and reading.

In this article, we will focus directly on speech

REMEMBER: The goal of this article is to provide a holistic view of what speech is so you may better help your student have clearer speech with faster results.

 

Three Parts to the Clarity of Speech

All children, whether they are English language learners or not develop their speech in the above 4 categories. While the children are developing their language, their speech becomes more and more clear for better communication.

The remainder of the article will be focused on these three components to speech.

REMEMBER:

3 parts to the clarity of speech

 

WHAT DOES EACH OF THESE WORDS MEAN?

3 parts of the clarity of speech

How to implement each of these quickly when listening to the speech of your students

 

Enunciation:

The clarity in which the word is said. This incorporates the articulation of the words. How the words are actually formed within our mouth, jaw, teeth, volume, throat, etc. The opposite of enunciation is mumbling and slurred words.

Watch this video. We can often understand words without ever moving our mouths. This is obviously not clear articulation and enunciation.

Here is what it may look like in the classroom:

Me: This is a mouth (shows a picture) Your turn.

Student: Thisa mou

Me: This is a mouth. th.

Student: Thisa mouth.

What do I notice for ENUNCIATION:

  1. The student blended more than one word together
  2. The student did not say the word is
  3. The student did not say the th sound at the end of the sentence the first time but did the second time.

Thoughts I have:

  • The student MAY have difficulty understanding how to move their tongue back and forth while their teeth are closed. Perhaps they are unaware as it is a sound you cannot see. Once shown it is easier for them.
  • If they are English as a second language student, they may be still learning the usage of the article is.
  • The student correctly said the th sound at the beginning of the sentence (this), but did not at the end of the sentence for the word mouth. They also were able to replicate the second time, but still blended the words mid-sentence. This leads me to believe they don’t have trouble with the th sound, but perhaps completing words.
    • Thisa – did not complete this before saying is, which sounds like one word when spoken in a sentence
    • mou- (did not say the full word mouth)

My next step: Become aware whether or not this is a pattern to not complete words of various endings. If that is the case, focus on individual clear words.

REMEMBER: Enunciation is related to how smooth and crisp it sounds. 

Pronunciation

The way individual words are said. Accents. The sounds that make up individual words.

  • Pronunciation in English may vary according to where you live. Depending if you are from the south, east coast or west coast of the USA.
    • For example:
      • coyote(keye ote versus keye oh tee),
      • Creek (creeeek versus crick)
      • Been (bin versus beeen)
      • Roof (rooof versus ruf)
  • Pronunciation is accent as well. For example, Australia, New Zealand, the UK and the USA all pronounce words differently.
  • Individual phonemes (sounds) of the language. This is different than enunciation. This is how the actual sounds are made. For example, many students say the sound w as v. These are two different phonemes. This would be incorrect pronunciation.

Many times we see pronunciation challenges in reading. A student will read a word incorrectly. Another is by making the l, w, th, z sounds incorrect.

Here is a great article written by reference.com specifically about what pronunciation is.

Here is what it may look like in the classroom:

Me: This is a mouth (shows a picture) Your turn.

Student: This is a mouw

Me: Th. Th. This is a mouth. Your turn.

Student: This is a moul

Me: Nice try! Look at my mouth (I circle my mouth and move closer) th. th.

Student: n, n, n

What do I notice for PRONUNCIATION:

  1. There were continual challenges with the sound th
  2. The student first understood the PLACEMENT of the tongue for the sound th. When they were corrected they moved their tongue. So they are well aware that moving the tongue can change a sound
  3. The student recognizes the sound of the th when I make it and is trying to replicate only that part of the sound. This means they are able to separate the various parts of that particular word.

Thoughts that I have:

Depending on the students’ native language, the th sound may be a sound some students cannot hear. This student was able to hear it, as they were changing that particular part of the sound and trying to match where within the word m-ou-th to change (th).

My next step: spend time explaining to the student how to make the th sound

1. I could write the explanation in google translate and then show (or copy/paste online) it in their native language

2. Using totaly physical response (gestures) I could clench my hands together hard showing to hold their tongue harder then when they say they l sound)

3. If they have limited speech say: tongue (show your tongue in the right placement), hard (clench hands) no voice (point to their throat and show no). Just breathe. thhhhhhhh.

REMEMBER: pronunciation is the way individual sounds are made, as well as accent

Nuanced speech

The way we complete the word

The smoothness of the word being spoken. How we transition from one word to the next word. The nuanced sounds as we speak sentences.

Here is what it may look like in the classroom:

Student: This iz a mouth. It tuh move ez quick uh ly when we uh speak.

Me: This iz a mouth. It movez quick ly when we speak.

Student: Thisiz a mouth. It tuh mov ez quick kuh ly when we uh speak.

What do I notice for Nuanced speech:

  1. The student struggles with where to have connecting words
  2. The student struggles with knowing where syllables are in more than one syllabic word
  3. The student often adds in an uh sound in between words. As the students’ language is Chinese, it is difficult for this student to end a sound not with a vowel.

My next step:

Type in the chat box or write down what the student is saying phonetically. Repeat back to the student what they say while they read along. Then re-type or write the correct phonetic way.  Throughout the lesson, write the u sound at the end of words and cross out when necessary. 

After they begin to see this pattern, do the same thing while writing spaces between the word. quick ly versus quickly. This way they can hear and see what they are saying out loud. 

REMEMBER: nuanced speech is related to how to connect words, the breathing between words and add in sounds non-native speakers add in

Putting it all together

Overall knowing the definition of the words nuanced speech, enunciation and pronunciation is not helpful. But knowing there is more than just pronunciation in how you say the words is very helpful to the student, and to the parents helping their children with homework.

Case story:

My experience with my student:

One of my students had a very difficult time speaking English. Claire knew all of her vocabulary words, could read on level 4 (as that was her English speaking level as well) and had great grammar. What she struggled with were reading new words, and speaking in sentences that were clear for me to understand.

Despite all of her grammar and vocabulary, she could barely say a sentence that was easy to understand. She also appeared to not be able to break apart words, despite passing all of her assessments when it came to showing the syllables.

What was happening:

After a time of working with her, I recognized a consistent pattern. She often added the sound uh to the end of her words. She also really struggled with adverb suffixes (ly), often adding in an extra breathe.

I realized what was happening. She did not struggle with the pronunciation of words. She essentially was challenged with enunciation and nuanced speech.

What I did:

  • I noticed she had two challenges
  1. Cluttering the words together which essentially made her mumble (enunciation). Not knowing how to move from saying the base word to conjugating or adding on adverbs or adverb suffixes**Why I did not see this as a pronunciation challenge: Because all of the base words were pronounced correctly. She also could say the sounds of the adverbs or adverb suffixes as well. What she couldn’t do was put them together. That is a nuanced speech challenge.She could say the individual sounds correctly but would clutter the words, making them into one word. This is an enunciation challenge (mumbling).
  2.  She did not know when to put a pause in the sentence between words and added in the sound uh in the “dead” spots between words.
  • I addressed the “uh” first. (sounds) Showing her that she added in sounds. It is easier to omit extra sounds than it is to change a pattern of speech. I wanted her to feel successful as often as possible.
  • By omitting the sound it changed the “dead” spots (the brief pauses between words). This made it easier to address her cluttering (enunciation). I focused on making sure every word was said individually. The nuance of how we sometimes blend words (for example Whatiz their name?) I would address later. I wanted crisp words so I could keep her speech as clear as possible.
  • Then, because we looked at words as a whole,  I was able to show Claire where not to breathe (for example quickly instead of quick ly). (Nuance speech)
  • Lastly, I addressed reading by syllables. As she was no longer taking breaths in the wrong place and adding in sounds, she had an easier time hearing the words as she sounded them out.

REMEMBER: When you have a student with multiple challenges, follow the natural Order of operations.

The natural progression of language is: 

(black = language development)    (orange = clarity of speech)

  • Sounds (individual phonemes) and tones
  • Basic words
  • Pronunciation
  • Phrases and sentences
  • Appropriate volume for words including when reading
  • Enunciation
  • Conversational speech (paragraphs each)
  • Nuance Speech

 

Don’t waste your students’ time

The goal is not to buy an object for every single vocabulary word and concept. It is  to get the kiddos talking more naturally in conversation around the subject you are teaching.

The Basics:

BEFORE GOING FURTHER LET’S DO 2 PICTURES WORTH OF DEFINITIONS TO MAKE SURE WE ARE ON THE SAME PAGE.

A prop is an object that is used to symbolically represent a concept. 

The object is for a CONCEPT, not a WORD.

For example:

Doll = cloths, verbs related to movement, family members, gender

baby child concrete floor cute
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A question mark drawn on a chalkboard = curiosity, intonation, confusion

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com
  • Some prop are 3-D, some are 2-D. They are both still called props.
  • Props can be used for many different concepts
  • Don’t get stuck on the literal comparison between object and concept.
  • Props are there to support your teaching, not to take place of your teaching. 
  • Props are meaningless and neutral until you give them meaning.

The following paragraph has been taken from a previous post. You can read more about how to set up your classroom based on your teaching style here. 

Based on your teaching style, you will use props differently to be most effective.

If you know your teaching style, you can jump to right after these grey boxes.

  • Visual/Spatial teachersuse a lot of visual props. 3-D and 2-D. Allow the children to see what you are teaching. Hold up props and write in different colors allowing the student to know the content by sight. Mind maps are really helpful in teaching students new words and concepts.

  • Logical/Mathematical teachers– have symbols that will represent concepts that you can refer back to often

  • Verbal/Linguistic teachers– will need heading words to help categorize the content. Using the chalkboard will be important for you. Perhaps even have a chalkboard and a whiteboard, being able to separate out vocabulary, root words and so forth

  • Musical/Rhythmic teachers – use your props to reference songs that the students may know. For example, show the days of the week and sing the song for the days of the week. A good morning song versus a good night song holding a moon and a sun

  • Bodily/Kinesthetic teacher– use the props and put them in different areas of the camera view. Perhaps a mammal on the left and a fish on the right. Point to each keeping the categories separate. Use the space in your classroom to your benefit.

  • Naturalist teacher – Use the space in your classroom to set up a mock scenario such as a store or mock vet etc. It doesn’t have to be extravagant. For example. Use all of your animal props and tape them to your wall according to the type of animal. Use your money and go buy a pet a jungle animal and farm animal.  Then quickly pull them off, and tape up your house and barn. Have the child put the animal in the correct place.

  • Interpersonal teacher- you will not need a lot of props to teach unless the student does. Use your chalkboard and minimal props to design conversational building activities. For example, use the screen to ask questions and then paraphrase each other’s comments. The set up of your classroom will be more geared toward having space as headers or 1 or 2 props as the main theme to build teamwork in answering questions. It may be important to have a 2-D image that says “Your turn, my turn” and another 2 images that say “Teacher” and “student”. Holding these props up will cue the student to know it is their turn to talk or yours. 

  • Intrapersonal teacher- It will be important for this type of teacher to recognize that many students are not deep thinkers. They have to learn to think deeply. A good way to have them reflect back is to have a prop that is a question mark. This will cue the student to realize you are giving them extra time to think. Using a lot of props will also help the student cue into that you are allowing them to reflect back on their own situation. For example, hold up a dog picture and you can say, “do you like big dogs or small dogs?” “Do you have a dog?” And this will build more of a thinking activity rather than the labeling vocabulary activities. You can also utilize the chatbox as a prop. Have them write to you, and you write back. Practicing spelling and grammar. 

To learn more about Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, and discover which type of teacher you are, you can read more here.


KNOW WHY YOU ARE USING A PROP

There’s a good way to use props: To entertain and catch the students attention when they wander.

There’s a better way to use props: To keep them laughing and engaged by watching you more intently and labeling vocabulary related to the props.

And there’s the best way to use props: Keep them engaged by understanding what you are saying so you can have a conversation.  This is even possible in levels 1 and 2 of language learning. It IS possible to have several looped conversations when they know extremely little amount of English. IF you use your props the BEST way. Read below a conversation I had with a  6 year old girl in level 1 English with less than a year of English language learning.

Don’t waste your students’ time by using props unwisely. Props can be used for entertainment, but they are better used to expand and teach a conversation in a more meaningful way

There are two types of props (they can be 2-D or 3-D)

  1. Contextual supportive props
  2. Symbolic educational props

 

Contextual supportive props

Most props can be considered contextual props. These are props that you can use 1 prop for 1 word.

Pretend cake = cake.  Baby doll = baby.

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These are props that can have a contextual representation. For example:

Calculator: math, numbers, add, subtract, multiply, dividie

Birthday cake: Birthdays, cake, candles, how old are you?

Money: Dollars, coins, money, buy

Emoticon magnets: Emotions, feeling, happy, sad, angry, worried, etc.

Sea animals: The names of the animals, ocean, mammals versus fish

Again, props are not to only be used as one prop = one word. They represent concepts.

 

Every time I teach about people or families or relatives, I always use peg dolls. They are moveable which I like, they are small enough that several can be in camera view at a time, and they are big enough to see without squinting.

Here is a conversation of how I may use my peg dolls props that go beyond a prop for the word. The girl I had this conversation with was 6 years old. She had less than 1 year of English language learning.

56312942_1382879821852329_3819170943503171584_n

Me: This is a house

Student: This is a house

Me: This is Annie (Show the girl peg doll). Hi Annie!

Student: Giggles as this is her name.

Me: Annie is in the house. (*Put Annie in the house)

Me: Is Mom in the house? (*moves the mom Peg doll in and out of the house over and over while saying yes? no?)

Student: Yes.

Me: Mom is in the house. Your turn.

Student: Mom is in the house.

Me: Good! Yes!

Me: Is Dad in the house? (*Move Dad peg doll in and out of the house)

Student: Yes.

Me: Well done! Dad is in the house. Your turn.

Student: Dad is in the house.

Me: This is a grandma. Is grandma in the house?

Student: No.

Me: Grandma is not in the house. Your turn.

Student: Grandma is not in the house

Me: This is a grandpa. Is grandpa in the house?

Student: No. Grandpa is not in the house

(learns the phrase from repeat patterns in this conversation aided by the visual representation of the props).

56739237_275608546704347_1830108388281810944_n-1.jpg

Me: Do you have a brother?

Student: Yes

Me: Is brother in the house?

Student: No

Me: Does brother sleep in the house?

Student: No. Brother no same house.

Me: My brother doesn’t sleep in my house. Your turn.

Student: My brother doesn’t sleep in my house.

Me: This is a cousin.

Me: I do not have a brother (*show the not sign) Your turn.

Student: I do not have a brother.

56168067_341739849796050_4843424264533049344_n.jpg

Cliff notes of the conversation:

Q: Why did I choose to not put the grandpa and grandma in the “not” section? 

A: I wanted to separate the concepts that the student did not have a brother versus she had grandparents, but they were not in the house.

Q: Why are there not two or more houses? 

A: Though it may make it clearer, I did not feel it entirely necessary. By saying not in the house, it didn’t matter where else they were other than in the house. Also… I just don’t want to have that many props. I want to make use of what I already have.

Q: Why did you not have the student repeat “This is a cousin?” 

A: I did not want to get into the concept of a cousin. I wanted to define what is and is not a brother first. 

Q: Why did you not have the student repeat after grandpa? 

A: The use of pause in a conversation is very important. By doing this, I allow the student to show me what they already know and have picked up from patterns in the conversation.

Q: Why did you have the student repeat after brother if they already learned the pattern?

A: I had just taught the student English for the words to not have a brother. This is different than in the house and not in the house. I wanted to highlight the concept by giving the exact phrase. 

Symbolic educational props

These props are for abstract concepts. For example, the question mark above.  I am a Visual, kinesthetic, musical teacher. These are my strengths for teaching as they are also my strengths for learning. Here are the symbolic props that I use:

 

Can you think of words and concepts you can use for each prop?

Not equal sign: Not, isn’t, don’t, different, not equal, opposite, incorrect, wrong

Similar: almost, close to, similar, about

The question mark in the speech bubble: thinking, unsure, why, curious, dreaming, “what’s on your mind”, I don’t know, hmmm, I don’t know

Emojis:

100%: perfect, excellent,  that’s right, (you got it right for pronunciation), accurate, 100, correct, right

Thumbs up: Any praiseworthy words, yes, (turn it upside down- no), thumb, finger

Heart emoji face: Love, really like, favorite, I want

Equal sign: The same, equal, exact, parallel, Vertical (turn it over- horizontal), green, qu sound when teaching the sound blend

Clock: Time, morning, afternoon, night, what time, when, numbers, big hand, little hand, circle

THE BOTTOM LINE:

Props have three purposes:

  1. To clarify a concept either contextually in conversation, or in teaching vocabulary

  2. To expand interaction and to allow a person to visually see the conversation

  3. To help differentiate words, meanings and concepts (for example the conversation above showing a person, not in the house versus not having a brother in the family). 

 

JUST TO SAY IT ONE MORE TIME:

There’s a good way to use props: To entertain and catch the students attention when they wander.

There’s a better way to use props: To keep them laughing and engaged by watching you more intently and labeling vocabulary related to the props.

And there’s the best way to use props: Keep them engaged by understanding what you are saying so you can have a conversation.  This is even possible in levels 1 and 2 of language learning. It IS possible to have several looped conversations when they know extremely little amount of English. IF you use your props the BEST way. Read below a conversation I had with a  6 year old girl in level 1 English with less than a year of English language learning.
The goal is not to buy an object for every single vocabulary word and concept. It is  to get the kiddos talking more naturally in conversation around the subject you are teaching. Don’t waste your students’ time by using props unwisely. Props can be used for entertainment, but they are better used to expand and teach a conversation in a more meaningful way

Your Classroom Set-Up Matters

Your Classroom Set-Up Matters.

For many, the set up of the classroom is mindless; especially in the online environment.

But it’s online that it matters MOST. 

IMG_3790Everything in this space is well thought out. Everything. Even the placement of the lamp and space between the wall and chair.

 

Let’s break it all down…

NUMBER ONE: I purposely chose to put my set up in a corner, and not have only a wall behind me. I wanted to use the wall space next to me to keep within arms reach my main props. Drawers are fine, but seeing them on the wall kept them visually accessible to me at all times. There have been many times in the moment of teaching I have seen a prop and realized the best way to teach a concept for that child was with that prop and was SO GRATEFUL it was next to me!

Being in a corner allows me to teach abstract concepts such as edges, corner, behind, next to, near, and far more easily.

NUMBER TWO: What the student can seeIMG_3793Hey guess what… it’s 8:37!

What do they see?

  • Magnetic Chalkboard: allows me to hang props on, draw and write on it, as well as use it as a prop.
  • Flags: I have purposely chosen Japan, Britain, China and USA flags because they are referenced in the classes I teach constantly. I will soon be adding in Canada as well. I want it visible to point at when I ask the question, ‘Where are you from?’ and ‘where do you live?’ I can also use them when I reference country, flag, and several other vocabulary words.
  • Clock: Great for vocabulary! Circle, numbers, teaching time, morning, afternoon, evening, night. Fantastic conversation starter! What do you do at _____ o’clock? Teaching opposites (black and white, 12 and 6, 3 and 8, long hand and short hand (long and short), front and back, turn around. We can also talk about the abstract concept of a time change, morning and night more easily.
  • Lastly, my world map. The world map is NOT fully visible in my camera. I have it purposely set to only show the bottom 1/4 of the map (map = vocabulary word!). The part that says, ‘The World’. (The world = vocabulary!) You can see the ice, water, the bottom of South America. It makes a great educational background and excellent prop for vocabulary. By also not showing many of the continents and countries, it avoids any controversies other countries have over what the accurate boundary of countries are.

NUMBER THREE: POCKET HOLDER

IMG_3169Keeping props visible allows me to visually prompt myself when needed

Why do I have them in pockets?

By putting my 3-D props in pockets, I am able to see the props and they are close by. This allows me to visually prompt myself in lessons when needed to use the prop. Sometimes, I don’t think we will need specific props. But after the conversation starts, its clear, that prop would be useful.

What are in my pockets?

Each of my pockets has a “purpose” for example:

01-06 are my art supplies. In one of my companies, we do projects together. So it is necessary. In the other company, I have the benefit of having them there as props 🙂

07-12 are my easter eggs, peg dolls, conjugation envelopes, money, and travel props.

13-24 are a jumble. It has my calculator, cords for plugging in my phone (I use it as a prop sometimes to show google images), bottom of the easter eggs and company-specific props.

It also has all of my extension games for teaching additional vocabulary and phrases.

***HOW I CHOSE WHAT PROPS TO HAVE**

  1. Just like I my rewards are open ended and not specific so are my props. I purposely chose to have humans, art supplies, 2 funny items (my wig and big glasses), magnetic numbers, animals, vehicles. Open-ended is important.
  2. I needed them to be small enough to fit in the pockets and large enough to show on the camera
  3. They need to have color. Not just black and white images. Give depth to what they see on the camera. Slideshows are very flat looking. You are flat and consistent (no variety), pictures on your phone are very flat looking. For anyone except Logical/Mathematical and Verbal and Linguistic learners, they need a variety of visual stimulus to learn. For more information about multiple intelligences and learning styles, please see my post here.
  4. They need to be quality looking toys. They do not have to be expensive. Just have them look professional.

 

NUMBER FOUR: 2-D props and images

IMG_3789

On the wall above the pockets are my 2-D google image open source

Just like the 3-D images, your 2-D images should have color. You can get open-source images on google images for props (avoid copyright images). I came up with these props OVER TIME. I did not start out with these images. Many of my images were obtained by doing the following:

  1. Go to google.com and type in the prop you need (for example type in Rainbow).
  2. make sure to add in “coloring page, open source” at the end of the word. For example, this is what I would type:   rainbow coloring page, open source
  3. Print out an open source image. And color it in (if you have a black and white printer or do not want to use color ink). **remember, in the USA, ink, and paper are tax write-offs.”

I chose my images based on the words I used often that I wished I had a prop for. This is my list:

  • Farm animals
  • Pet animals
  • Wild animals
  • Barn, House, (I will be adding in an apartment soon)
  • Snow, rain, cloud, sun, storm, rainbow ( I will be adding a moon and a star soon)
  • Fish, insect, mammal, reptile, dragon, bird
  • Fire
  • nest, egg, home
  • Cloths
  • Food
  • Birthday / Holidays

IMG_3794

Some of my props are my kids’ old toys that they no longer use. A doll that you can dress up, a cake and ice cream, play food.

(The red bag are instructional forms I use and the clipboard has rewards. More on those in later posts)

NUMBER FIVE: Instructional versus Vocabulary props

IMG_3796THE BOWL CAN BE USED AS A PROP! In, out, on, inside

INSTRUCTIONAL PROPS VERSUS VOCABULARY PROPS

As a visual, kinesthetic, musical learner, I really value props. They are so important to me in how I teach.  It is important to keep 3 things in mind:

  1. What kind of teacher are you?
  2. What type of learner is your student?
  3. How does your student best show what they know?

Based on these 3 answers, you will know what type of instructional props to choose from. Notice depending on the type of teacher you are, some of your instructional props is also the same vocabulary building props.

  • Visual/Spatial teachers – use a lot of visual props. 3-D and 2-D. Remember as a possible auditory learner, you may need to focus on not talking a lot as they may not be. By talking a lot, the learner does not have a lot of time to speak about what they are learning. An important part of learning a new subject. Build in receptive learning activities where they practice listening to the language. This will help you feel successful, and also give them something specific to focus on.
  • Logical/Mathematical teachers– have symbols that will represent concepts that you can refer back to often
  • Verbal/Linguistic teachers– will need heading words to help categorize the content. Using the chalkboard will be important for you. Perhaps even have a chalkboard and a whiteboard, being able to separate out vocabulary, root words and so forth
  • Musical/Rhythmic teachers – use your props to reference songs that the students may know. For example, show the days of the week and sing the song for the days of the week. A good morning song versus a good night song holding a moon and a sun
  • Bodily/Kinesthetic teacher– use the props and put them in different areas of the camera view. Perhaps a mammal on the left and a fish on the right. Point to each keeping the categories separate. Use the space in your classroom to your benefit.
  • Naturalist teacher – Use the space in your classroom to set up a mock scenario such as a store or mock vet etc. It doesn’t have to be extravagant. For example. Use all of your animal props and tape them to your wall according to the type of animal. Use your money and go buy a pet a jungle animal and farm animal.  Then quickly pull them off, and tape up your house and barn. Have the child put the animal in the correct place.
  • Interpersonal teacher- you will not need a lot of props to teach unless the student does. Use your chalkboard and minimal props to design conversational building activities. For example, use the screen to ask questions and then paraphrase each other’s comments. The set up of your classroom will be more geared toward having space as headers or 1 or 2 props as the main theme to build teamwork in answering questions. It may be important to have a 2-D image that says “Your turn, my turn” and another 2 images that say “Teacher” and “student”. Holding these props up will cue the student to know it is their turn to talk or yours. 
  • Intrapersonal teacher- It will be important for this type of teacher to recognize that many students are not deep thinkers. They have to learn to think deeply. A good way to have them reflect back is to have a prop that is a question mark. This will cue the student to realize you are giving them extra time to think. Using a lot of props will also help the student cue into that you are allowing them to reflect back on their own situation. For example, hold up a dog picture and you can say, “do you like big dogs or small dogs?” “Do you have a dog?” And this will build more of a thinking activity rather than the labeling vocabulary activities. You can also utilize the chatbox as a prop. Have them write to you, and you write back. Practicing spelling and grammar. 

To learn more about which type of teacher you are, look at my blog post here about multiple intelligences and learning preferences. Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

NUMBER SIX: Space to move

IMG_3791It is so important to give yourself space. To stand, to sit, to lean, to turn around, to bend over. For kinesthetic students, you will be encouraging them to move. And therefore, you will have to move too. In my classroom, I have enough room to move my chair to the side and stand up. And to move my chair all the way to the wall and back. Always staying within camera view.

NUMBER SEVEN: Your chairIMG_3798Your chair should be:

  • Easy to move when necessary
  • Comfortable to sit in
  • Allow you to lean back
  • Allow you easily to move your arms up and down, right and left without bumping and hurting yourself

NUMBER EIGHT: Always have a keyboard ready for typing and mouse ready as a prop if you teach English online to ESL students. The chatbox is super helpful. More on that later.IMG_3797

NUMBER NINE: A good set up headphones is a MUST. IMG_3792

A good set of headphones is a must! If your students cannot hear you… it won’t be a good class. I personally use gaming headphones. Mine are SADES Model SA-901. I bought them on ebay. Here is a non-affiliated link:

Headphones brand and model: SADES Model SA-901

Features that were important for me:

  • Comfortability. I teach for anywhere between 4-8 hours a day. I needed my headphones to not give me a headache.
  • A mute button for me. As I was preparing the class, or was there early, I did not want my students to hear me. You know… sometimes you get to class early and you have to go to the bathroom… mute button can be important. Or suddenly a little one decides to randomly walk into your class and start talking to you? (what the heck?)
  • A mute button for the student. I will sometimes mute the student when they are literally screaming (what the heck?) into the headphones. Not angry… just screaming. (Gotta love 3 and 4 years old children).
  • A volume button. Help the student be louder, by turning them up. Or maybe down when necessary.

*This brand and model is a USB port based headphone model. You must have an available USB port on your computer to plug in the headphones.*

 

NUMBER 10: Keep a lamp nearby…. AND EXTRA LIGHT BULBSIMG_3788

I use my lamp CONSTANTLY. Teach the difference between good morning and good night by turning on and off the lamp. Light and dark. Bright and dark. FABULOUS!

A TIP FOR THE NEWBEE… KEEP EXTRA LIGHTBULBS NEARBY. More than once my lamp has gone off and I have been stuck in the dark. I keep an extra one in my number pocket holder so it’s easily accessible.

 

 

Let’s talk about timing in the ESL online classroom

This video is on 3 things:

  1. Topics of slides: know what you are teaching on each slide before starting. THE MAIN FOCUS – not just the content

  2. How to time it: How do you speed up or slow down? What do you dwell on and what do you skim over? 

  3. How to expand without losing the focus of the slide: In what way do you extend, and still highlight the main point of the slide? This is different than content on the slide. This is about the purpose of the slide.

***TEACH YOUR KIDS THE MEANING OF THE PHRASE ‘I WANT’***

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Check it out here. Pacing your classes

 

Cliff notes and highlights of the video:

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Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom

I know how much you are struggling with knowing how to scaffold and tailor a class to the children you are teaching. You care about them so much. Let’s talk. I have time and am ready to be your ear as you navigate this.

  I am not going to lie and tell you it’s a quick easy fix. Or that it will come quick and natural to you. It will take practice. But really, it does not have to take a lot of time.

For this, I want you to sit with the information. Let it simmer. AND THEN decide how to apply it to what you already know. Let this just be a guide throughout the rest of the blog posts you read. 

Recognize it for what it is. An overarching theory and method of approach. It’s not a to-do list.

Here is a link to a video that will take you through this blog post

Take a moment and go back in time… VISUALIZATION

Take a deep breath out and slow a deep breath in. Let it out slowly as you imagine yourself sitting in a brown hardback chair pushed up close to the desk in front of you. This desk is a school desk. You are in the 6th grade, at the ripe age of 12 years old. Your teacher comes up to you and asks a question. One that you have never been asked before.

“How do you want to learn today’s subject of animal kingdoms?”

  1.  Read a book and write about what you learned. Afterward, study the Latin roots?
  2.  Look at 1 animal from each animal kingdom. Compare and contrast information.  Use a spreadsheet software and create a spreadsheet outlining all of the data you learned.
  3.  Play charades pretending to be various animals. Afterward, play a Wii game that uses your whole body to categorize the various animals.
  4.  Go to the zoo, take photographs featuring each characteristic of the animals?
  5.  Look through a magazine and cut out the animals, placing them in the right categories? And then on a map plot out where the animals live?
  6.  Make a team project about one of the animal kingdoms, listen to each teams presentation, and then tutor another person from a different team on your animal kingdom? 
  7.  Compose a melody of each of the animal kingdoms including various topics and facts about the different animal kingdoms?
  8.  Be given a specific debatable topic about an animal kingdom. Then relate the content to your own personal life. Defend your position and respond to the various ethical dilemmas surrounding your topic?

 

Take a look at what number you chose above, and match it to the number below. 

1 Verbal/linguistic
2 Logical/mathematical
3 Bodily/Kinesthetic
4 Naturalist
5 Visual/Spatial
6 Interpersonal
7 Musical/Rhythmic
8 Intrapersonal

We each have various intelligences. We are not labeled as one or another.

We also all have various intelligences that we use depending on the circumstance in front of us. This is not boxing anyone into one category or another.

Instead, this can be used to find the most effective way for you to take in information and recall it later. It is a great way to help you study, and ENJOY learning! Could you imagine going to school each day and LOVING learning?

  It is often true, that students like variety in the method of learning. But it is not always true that students like a variety of approaches to learning.

Learn about the difference between method and approach

 

Changing the Method meanings changing the way in which you teach within one intelligence:

Verbal/Linguistic varieties: read a book, poem or short story, Share your ideas, have a debate, give a speech, compare and contrast information, make a journal, write a book report, learn a second language, learn vocabulary words, study etymology.

 

Changing the Approaches means to change the intelligences

Day 1 teach Verbal/Linguistically. 

Day 2 teach using musical/rhythmical

Day 3 teach in a naturalist manner

 

I have found one of the most challenging things a struggling learner will face is that the approach is always changing. One day they are singing the facts and the next day they are supposed to recite them.

How frustrating if they are visual learners and now they are faced with having to auditorily learn something and then prove they know it through logic and reasoning.

 Likewise, the same struggling student then is given 15 worksheets of logical reasoning to learn a math problem, and though one day they can show “mastery” in the vocabulary for question and answer, they never did learn the meaning of the word for any functional use.

 

Let’s talk about what this looks like in the classroom.

Intelligence List

In other words, the students are

What it looks like in a student learning What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know
Verbal/Linguistic In other words, the students are

Word smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Learns to read, write, and speak easily
  • Communicates effectively with the teacher
  • Has a good vocabulary
  • Spells easily
  • Grammar comes easily
  • Reads frequently by choice
  • Likes to tell stories
  • Makes jokes with words
  • The Socratic method works really well
  • May talk or make comments under their breath or to other students
  • May not seem like they are listening as they are not looking at the speaker or screen
  • Reads under the desk while the teacher is talking
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  1. Does well in presentations
  2. Can read a story to you
  3. Have discussions or debates around the topic
  4. Explain a concept, play teacher
Bodily and Kinesthetic In other words, the students are

Body smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Has good motor skills
  • Good body language
  • Uses gestures and facial expressions to communicate well
  • Learns with hands-on activities
  • Moves their body to learn vocabulary and content
  • Coordinated
  • Can act out and role play easily
  • Depicts concepts from movement including sign language
  • Using manipulatives and props help
  • Put together a puzzle or other piece-to-parts project
  • Project-based learning works very well
  • Visiting the real place helps
  • Science experiments work well
  • Move around (jumping, skipping, walking, moving while learning information. For example walk and read)
  • Doesn’t sit still very long
  • Fidgets what may seem “mindlessly” even if the item they are fidgeting with might break
  • Chews on their pens and pencils
  • Picks at their erasers and other items scratch their desk while sitting
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  1. Create a play
  2. Take things apart and put them back together
  3. Build models or dioramas
  4. Play charades for vocabulary
  5. Move while reciting information
  6. Dissect a plant and tell you the vocabulary words while doing the project (opposed to just identifying the pieces. They need to see the process to remember where it is to know what the answer is)
  7. Stretch and do yoga while giving you the answers
Logical and

Mathematical

In other words, the students are

Math and Logic smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Patterns to information are easy to discover
  • Algorithms and equations come easily
  • Thinks very analytically and clearly
  • Sequential in their talking
  • Loves logic and reasoning
  • Good at math
  • Remembers events and is good at time oriented things
  • Uses symbols to remember other information
  • Often needs higher level thinking to be involved in order for it to be interesting to them
  • Use numbers
  • Use calculators and rulers
  • Use spreadsheet software
  • Write an equation
  • Becomes restless if the information has already been explained or is mostly explained and they know the outcome
  • Says “I know” a lot (even if they don’t) and try to finish the assignment on their own
  • Has a hard time listening to all directions
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  1. Analyze data
  2. Apply information
  3. Brainstorming
  4. Classify and categorize
  5. Compare and contrast
  6. Decipher codes
  7. Discover pattern and trends
  8. Evaluate ideas
  9. Outline material
  10. Make inferences and predictions
  11. Sequence events
  12. Use graphic organizers
  13. Use numbers
Naturalist In other words, the students are

Nature smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Can easily categorize natural items
  • Good at astronomy, biology, meteorology
  • Good with animals, fish, and wildlife
  • Good with non-natural items such as cars, machines, airplanes, fixing toasters etc.
  • Do best when information is related to the real world
  • Very aware of their natural surroundings
  • Good observational skills
  • Garden for fun
  • Tries to take the information you give them and is motivated to figure out how to apply to the real world
  • Asks the question of how or why a lot
  • Seems spacy and disconnected
  • Explores and is constantly curious
  • Doesn’t seem to listen
  • Has to touch everything
  • Takes things apart and tries to put them back together
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  • Record changes in development
  • Great at record keeping
  • Pays attention to detail such as color, size, form, actions, and reactions
  • Great at taxonomy
  • Sorts and categorizes non-natural items easily
  • Good with photography
  • Collects specimens or “treasures”
  • Remembers videos
  • Observes wildlife and natural life
Visual and Spatial In other words, the students are

Art and Space smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Often thinks in pictures and images
  • Uses a lot of detail to explain themselves
  • Learns through visuals
  • Likes to draw and create
  • Focus’ on details that may seem unnecessary but are important to them
  • Uses imagination
  • Visual aids are helpful
  • Guided meditations and imagery
  • Spends a lot of time thinking prior to doing
  • Likes to watch movies
  • May “draw out” several versions before settling on an idea
  • Plans to plan their plan 😉 In other words, they like to see the outcome in full prior to doing it
  • Draws constantly while the teacher is talking
  • Fidgets or folds the corners of their books while listening
  • Doesn’t always have great eye contact in a classroom.
  • Has to touch everything
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  • Art projects
  • Craft projects
  • Watch a video and report on it
  • Sketch what they remember
  • Compare and contrast
  • Tell a story
  • Create a brochure, logo, design of clothing etc
  • Paint, sculpt, draw, posters, visual aide etc
  • Take photographs
  • Use paint or drawing software
  • Imagine or pretend the end to a story
  • Mind maps
  • Build a 3D image
  • Make a chart or route
  • Estimate the size or distance
  • Play with puzzles or mazes
  • Use page layout software
  • Graphic organizers
Interpersonal In other words, the students are

People smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Make and maintain friendships easily
  • Sensitive to feelings and moods of others
  • Good mediators
  • Learn best when interacting with other people
  • Respect others easily
  • Resolve conflicts easily
  • Learn best when working with others on projects
  • Do well in debates
  • Succeed at team games
  • Does well when interviewing others
  • Can tutor and teach the material well
  • Good at role-playing
  • Can plan events
  • Writes collaborative papers
  • May talk a lot in class
  • Seems distracted by other conversations
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  • Plan a pretend event
  • Write a collaborative paper
  • Do a team building activity
  • Have a debate defending a topic
  • Conduct an interview
  • Have a team presentation
  • Paraphrase an author
  • Teach a topic to the class
Musical and Rhythmic In other words, the students are

Music smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Hums, sings, or whistles a lot
  • Can always relate the information
  • Can change the word to a song quickly
  • Makes jokes using lyrics
  • Can easily tell you the first sound or last sound in words
  • Does well breaking words into syllables
  • Good sense of rhythm and timing
  • Once they learn to read they have a good reading voice
  • Listens to music while studying
  • Can read and write music easily
  • Remembers information when putting it to song
  • Often learns best with music in the background
  • Sensitive to pitch, timbre, timing, tone, and rhythm
  • Does not struggle with tonal languages
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  • Compose a melody with the information needed
  • Change the words to a song to fit the information needed
  • Clap out the vocabulary words
  • Categorize words by different pitches (high, funny voice, low etc)
  • Separate information into categories based on how many syllables there are
  • Assign an instrument to represent various meanings. For example, the trumpet represents the word loud, the violin represents the word high, the drum represents the word low.
Intrapersonal In other words, the students are

Self-smart

What it looks like in a student learning

  • Prioritizes homework well
  • Sets goals and is always working towards the next goal
  • Keeps daily logs
  • Observes mood changes
  • Reflects on learning
  • Relates content easily to their own life
  • Thinks about thinking
  • Works independently
  • Writes about wants and needs
  • Writes autobiographies and personal poetry
What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know

  • Defend a position
  • Express likes and dislikes
  • Respond to hypothetical dilemmas
  • Write an ethical code
  • Develop a pretend country

APPLYING THIS INFORMATION TO REAL LIFE:

Within this blog post, I have given multiple examples of how to teach in various intelligences.

 Visual/Spatial:

  • I have used COLOR CODED EACH SECTION OF THIS POST. This helps the visual learner know I am transitioning from one topic to another. I have also tried to stay consistent in the color coding to reference previous sections more easily.
  • I have changed the font to show the importance of various parts of the post
  • I have used charts to break up information to make it easier to compare and contrast
  • Using bullet point in one section versus numbers in another help to break up the information (even though we are taught in school to be consistent *wink*

Bodily/Kinesthetic:

  • In the video, I show exactly how to apply certain aspects of information it in a manner that the learner can copy what I am doing at the moment. 

Logical/Mathematical: 

  • I have done my best to sequence the material in a very methodical way. To begin with, deciding what you are, apply it to yourself, seeing how it works in the real world, and then imagining their own students.
  • Using charts and outlines to allow for inferences, categorizing and analyzing of information

Naturalist: 

  • In the video, I use my classroom that I teach in. We go through actual problems and situations that I come a crossed daily. Problem solves, and if the student chooses can do the problem with me at that moment.

Verbal/Linguistic: 

  • I have written out all of the information that I am trying to convey. As avid readers, I am hopeful that this blog post is helpful to verbal and linguistic learners.
  • A lot of comparing and contrasting is used throughout the post

**I purposely put the headings: In other words, the students are, What it looks like in a student learning, What it may look like when the student is trying to show what they know as a header in each column, because unless a person is logic and math or word smart, it is difficult to keep the headings in memory as you read through the list. By adding the headings all the way down, it makes the information easier to RECEIVE. That is the main goal as a teacher, to have the student RECEIVE and RETAIN the information. Even if it is more work for the teacher 🙂  

SO HOW DO YOU APPLY THIS TO THE ONLINE CLASSROOM LEARNING ENVIRONMENT?

  • Identify 2-4 of the students learning intelligences. This will give you variety and various approaches depending on what topic you are teaching. To always teach in song and music to learn English would not be super effective. Unless the child wants to only use English to sing.
  • As you approach each topic, make a list of ways you can teach that unit. How can you connect with your student in the learning intelligence that is most interesting and easy for them to RETAIN information?
  • Identify your student tends to express themselves best using a different intelligence than how they learn. If they do, it may benefit you to teach using one method, and do assessments, projects, and reports using another intelligence.

Watch it here. How do you apply this in the classroom?

 

 

Putting it all together

Hi Rachel,

Of course, I would be happy to write out a quick summary for you. Thanks for asking!

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First, please don’t worry. It is perfectly normal to be overwhelmed.

 

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Here are some links you may find useful:

How to find the child’s interest

What rewards can you buy to save money?

If you can only buy one reward, what do you buy?

Here are some answers to your other questions:

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Where do you store your rewards?

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I store all of my rewards in the same place I store my teaching props.

You can get one of your own here (non-affiliated link)

Number pocket chart

Main points of rewards:

  • Start with one reward, you don’t have to buy a ton of toys
  • Use rewards to teach a concept
  • Rewards can be adapted to students age, gender, English language level and interests (see this blog post for more information)
  • STREAMLINE (see this blog post for more information)
  • How and when to reward is based on timing and goals you are working on

A word on rewards not being linked to smiling and laughing…

Typically, when we think about rewards, we think YAHOO! We think of presents.

But rewards in the classroom, work a little bit different. The word becomes a jargon word. 

The reward is neutral. What has been attached the word ‘reward’ is complex.

20%

 

There is an ongoing trend right now in ESL classrooms, that every 5 minutes you give a reward. By the end of 25 minutes, you have given rewards and kept their interest and have “done what you are supposed to do”. 

Additionally, there is an idea that the rewards don’t mean anything to the children. This is ONLY TRUE if you DO IT WRONG. 

There is an appeal to only give rewards at the END of a slide or task. This does not make sense, and will not keep the children ENGAGED in your reward. 

As you can see above, a reward is neutral and that is about 20% of the complex system. It does matter that it is kept neutral, but it’s as equal in value to two other portions of the system.

Timing matters

A child struggles and struggles with the concept of reading silent e words. He has the following short paragraph to read.

“We need eggs. We need to go to the store. Will you go to the store?”

When does it make the most sense to send him a star? At the end of the sentence? Your child is a struggling English language learner.

YES, you can for sure make it easy to understand (circle store, thumbs up and give a star). OR you can make it exciting!!!

We need eggs.  (sit and listen)

We need to go to the store (reads it right).

WOOOOOOOW *BING!**** give a star and celebrate with a fist bump.

(underline the next sentence. Smile with your thumbs up, showing you believe in him). He confidently finishes the paragraph. “Will you go to the store?” saying it again correctly. 

High five. Circle both the words store, and nod firmly. HE DID IT! 

Timing. Matters.

A child laughing, smiling and engaged often comes from feeling comfortable. Feeling successful. And feeling like they are succeeding. Using your reward system may not bring out a smile in him DURING the reward. But you will certainly gain more smiles and laughs DURING THE LESSON if the reward system is done well. 

Warmly,

Rebecca

Work Smart Not Hard

Hello Rachel,

What a long day huh? Getting ready to bring your kids to soccer practice tonight, you have a load of laundry, a pile of dishes and have no idea what is for dinner still left on your to-do list… and…  you just want sleep.

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Thank you for reaching out to me for help! I want to help you with your questions on how to tailor to the child using the rewards you have.

 

IN SHORT. NO! DO NOT GO BUY MORE ITEMS FOR YOUR REWARDS!

Let’s take what you know about rewards from the last 2 conversations and make your life easier. Let’s work smart, not hard, ok? (*and inexpensive, not expensive)

This is your checklist:

  1. Choose whichever reward you want

Pretty easy huh? (*Yes I know. Not correct as a list is 2 or more- usually 3 or more. But I wanted a smile out of you. So much stress… relaaaax).

The reward you choose for the day should fit all kids. I talked about using rewards that are gender, age, and interest neutral. That is because you use the child’s motivation to tailor it. You could use emoji’s, easter eggs, stackable numbers, etc. It doesn’t really matter the prop, as its neutral.

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Here is the formula I use to do what I call streamlining.

You are going to identify what the goal for your child is. This is your focus area of the lesson. This does not replace the lesson objective, but it does make the lesson more student-specific. For example, I have students who come in already knowing all the material and vocabulary. The lesson objective is to teach the vocabulary. Well, that lesson is a bit a waste of time then. So I may focus on pronunciation.

Some other areas you may focus on:

Does he have a hard time staying focused?

Can he not remember vocabulary very well?

Do you need to help him speed up his reading?

What is your child’s goal in the classroom?

When they do one of the things above they are struggling with (or whichever you chose for them) that is when you will give the reward.

Next, you have spent time with this child. What have you found were his interests?

  • Sound effects?
  • Dressing up?
  • Disney Princess’?
  • Football (soccer)?
  • Movement (jumping, sitting, running)?
  • Singing?
  • Deserts?

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Here is a video explaining how to combine the reward and goals

 

I wanted to also cover one other area. What if you have never met the student coming into class? And there are zero teacher notes, so essentially you are going in blind?

Every student I have can usually fall into one of these catagories for goals:

Pronunciation, reading, receptive comprehension or expressive English challenges.

Here are quick things you can test to see what gets them looking closer or more interested in your lessons: props, sound effects, questions, using the chatbox

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Here is a case study that may help you with a brand new studen you have never taught before:

Child: 12 year old boy, Carl who speaks great English, advanced for level 3

Reward: Emojis

Goal: Reading

Motivation: Writing in the chat box

How to reward him: Each time he reads the slide 80% or better you remove an emoji and the boy answers the question under the emoji in the chatbox.

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Hope that was helpful to you in helping you to tailor the rewards.

 

Warmly,

Teacher Rebecca

 

Classroom Reward System

 
Let’s face it, all teachers want reward systems for kids that are appealing. We also do not want our entire work area to be full of toys and clutter.
 
Let me show you how to use one reward system for students that adapt to age of the child and level of English. Let your students learn through reinforcement that is likeable.
Here is a video that will show this in more detail. Click here

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In our next video, we will discuss how to take the rewards you do have; and combine them to make new secondary rewards with little to no effort… see you soon.

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Buy these here:

Wooden Numbers- Click here: The ones I have are from a swap shop, so I am unsure who made them. But these would work great! (non-affiliated)

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Resources that may be of interest to you:

The Only Secondary Rewards You Will Ever Need!

Reward the kids and keep your sanity

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Have questions? Please comment below

 

Stop spending! Start saving on your reward system!

YOU JUST GOT HIRED… YAHOO MONEY! But oh yea… bills. Reward systems for online students can be tricky! And they can become expensive…fast!

You just checked your schedule. For your upcoming classes you have:

A 12 year old boy

3 year old girl who is supposed to be 5

8 year old girl

…and holy smokes! A 9 year old boy who lives in Florida, speaks perfect English and is in level 2.

How the heck do you buy rewards for all of your students with $5.00 remaining “spending money” you have allotted yourself? And never mind they have booked you 3 times this week…this is unsustainable.

Sound familiar? Then lets talk….

The only rewards you will need for this profession are listed below.

(*For your $5 for this month- please click here to my previous post.)

 

 

These can be adapted to age, stage, gender and level. They can also be combined (post coming soon) to make more rewards when needed, with very little time or effort. Most can be bought at the Dollar store or printed off of google images.

Where to buy/print them off 

(I am not affiliated with any of these stores/links/companies)

Bugs: I bought mine at the dollar store in a package. You can also buy them at Walmart, Target or Amazon: Bugs  

Sea animals: I bought mine at the dollar store in a package. You can also buy them at Walmart, Target or Amazon: Sea animals

Puzzle: I bought mine at Walmart, but you can also buy it here at ibuyofficesupply: puzzles

Balancing toy: This is a popular one among kids: Balancing toy

Easter Eggs: Dollar store, party stores, walmart, target, gas stations… anywhere…. or here 🙂 Easter eggs

Wooden number balancing toy: The ones I have are from a swap shop, so I am unsure who made them. But these would work great! wooden numbers

Melisa and Doug Birthday cake/reward: Melisa and Doug have several different birthday cakes. You can buy them all over. Walmart, Target, Barnes and Noble… or here: birthday cake

Smiley faces: these are great! If there is only one reward you can buy- get these smiley faces

Money: I did not feel it important to have a lot of money. 1 of each bill, so I borrowed one of each of my children’s bills. Dollar stores have play money, as well as Walmart and Target. Or you can buy it here:play money

Calculator: Dollar store, Walmart, Target, Office store or here: Calculator

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For the following 3 games, this is what you will do: Cars Auto shop, Funny person, Habitat with animals (*I will be making some PDF’s to print out soon) . You will be printing out open sourced (not copyrighted) images from google. It is important you type in “coloring page” and NOT printable… as that is different.

Cars Auto shop, Funny person, Habitat with animals

1. Go to www.google.com

2. Type in:

– Cars movie coloring page

– Body coloring page (separate body parts: head coloring page, hands coloring page, feet coloring page, eyes coloring page, nose coloring page, mouth coloring page, hair coloring page)

– Nest coloring page, beehive coloring page, house coloring page, barn coloring page (type in each as a separate search)

3. Print them out

4. Laminate them *OR* what I did… use clear packing tape, and tape them 🙂 works the same.

5. You can also choose NOT to color them – or print another set. This can be used for an additional reward. Color each part of the barn each time they do something awesome. (*use dry erase markers).

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Resources you may find of interest:

How to adapt 1 reward for several levels and ages

What to use your $5 on this month

How to begin organizing your daily life

 

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Have questions? Please comment below

 

Reward the Kids and Keep your Sanity

So you have been hired, and you learn about this new thing… secondary rewards. And then your brain goes *EXPLOSION* Are you kidding?!  How am I supposed to please and entertain every single child between the ages of 4 and 12 both masculine individuals and feminine and of all interests???? …. *breathe, breathe, breathe*

Well, that’s a good question.  So here’s the short answer:

Get 1 reward… this one.

These last FOREVER, hold up great, and have better graphics than most magnetic emojis that I have seen (and previously bought). I have taught over 2,000 classes with these.

Yes they are used but… great condition overall! They are more diverse than the $0.99 ones (*I did those first on Amazon), and my kids respond WAY BETTER to these! They are also easier to see in the camera since they are brighter, and have more diverse emotions.  All ages, stages, and genders have loved them without fail (*Pretty good average eh?).

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BUT… are you like me? Do you get bored easily and teach a million classes? Do you need diversity because you have the same kids day after day? Kids that take 3 or 4 classes per week, and the same reward is not cutting it? Well then, you are in the same camp as me…. and stay tuned for the next few posts we will explore:

  1. How to use minimal rewards for maximum interest
  2. How to combine the rewards to make more, quickly easily and for free
  3. How to have infinite reward ideas at your disposal
  4. Special rewards for birthdays and holidays with little or no effort
  5. How to create your own on the spot
  6. Break them down per age and teaching level, and how to adapt to the student when needed

ENJOY!

Want to buy these? (non-affiliated… I just really love the product!): Magnetic emojis

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Resources that may be of interest to you:

Start organizing your day

Adapting the reward system you have

Stop spending! Start saving on your reward system!

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Have questions? Please comment below